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20130228
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
explore the legal and other issues surrounding the u.s. policy. >> ifill: then, federal and state governments sue a credit ratings agency it says gave good ratings to bad mortgage investments. >> brown: ray suarez looks at president obama's use of campaign-style events to push his legislative agenda. >> ifill: hari sreenivsan examines a million-dollar match fixing scandal shaking the world of international soccer. >> brown: and playing with the enemy: we have the story of an orchestra of israelis and arabs coming together for music, and maybe more. >> the only way that we can achieve anything that is remotely related to peace is if we sit together and talk or if we at least try to. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> sailing through the heart of historic landscapes you see things differently. you get close to iconic landmarks, to local life, to cultural treasures. it's a feeling that only the river can give you. these are journeys that change your perspective on the world and perhaps even yourself. viking
, the state of play in florida, which has some of the least restrictive gun laws in the u.s. >> nothing really truly equalizes a smal petite woman with someone who's 6'3, 230 pounds who's angry except a firearm. >> those weapons often times fall in the hands of bad folks in our communities. >> suarez: hari sreenivasan brings together high school students from across the country to talk about guns and violence. >> woodruff: and as oscar night nears, tony scott, movie critic for the "new york times," gives us his take on the latest buzz about wild cards and front runners. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station fro
it means for the u.s. military. i'm joined by deputy secretary of defense ashton carter. welcome, mr. secretary s let justick up wth tat coent from some republicans that this is exaggerated. >> well, for us in the defense department, unfortunately, it's not exaggerated. in fact, we don't want to take any of these steps. we certainly are trying to do it in the way that does the minimum damage to national security. we don't have a lot of flexibility, and we don't have a lot of time in that regard. sequester requires us to find $46 billion in the last half of the year, and then we have an additional problem with the lack of an appropriations bill, which is a particular problem for us. you put those two things togher, and in some of accounts that fund training, for example, for army units, those accounts are 30% short over the year, and now we only have half the year in which to make up those savings. what that means is we're ging to protect the wars in afghanistan-- we've got to nund them. we have to fund-- need to fund military personnel. the president exempted military personnel from
life in prison. in economic news, output at u.s. auto plants fell in january, and that pushed overall manufacturing down after two months of gains. and on wall street today, the dow jones industrial average gained eight points to close at 13,981. the nasdaq fell six points to close at 3,192. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq dropped a tenth of a percent. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: president obama wrapped up his post-state of the union tour with a visit to his hometown today. margaret warner has the story. >> warner: the president's trip to chicago came amid the country's new focus on gun violence. and while he was there to talk about raising the minimum wage and expanding preschool for children, the city's surge of gun killings wasn't far from his mind. >> last year, there were 443 murders with a firearm on the streets of this city, and 65 of those victims were 18 and under. so that's the equivalent of a newtown everfour months. and that's precisely why the overwhelming majority of americans are asking for some common-sense propo
these circumstances. aise said, in some cases, that's notoingo be possible. >> woodruff: i is u.s. national security at stake because of what might happen? >> it is, in the following sense-- by the end of the year, as i said, two-third of our army units, active-duty army units and all of our reserve units will not be ready to fight other wars. many of our air force air units will not be ready to fight other wars. a third of our ships in the pacific will not be at sea. it's not becau they-- they're not there. the ips aren't there. it's because we can't afford to operate them because we don't have any money left in the accounts that fund them. and we have to cut account by account by account. that's what sequestration forces us to do. >> woodruff: if this gets resolved secretary carter between now and march 1, or soon thereafter, are will all these cuts go away. >> oh, yes, we would never do any of these things. it's everyone's hope that deals that cover revenues and expenditures which everybody knows is necessary that that deal can be made, if congress can come around with a deal like that that the p
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)